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Saluting The Ahimsa And Satyagraha Of Mahatma Gandhi on Martyr’s Day

Saluting The Ahimsa And Satyagraha Of Mahatma Gandhi on Martyr’s Day

News Desk

Saluting The Ahimsa And Satyagraha Of Mahatma Gandhi on Martyr’s Day

President Ram Nath Kovind and Prime Minister Narendra Modi join the nation in paying homage.

India and the rest of the world paid homage to Mahatma Gandhi on his 70th death anniversary on Martyrs’ Day on Tuesday. Bapu, the name he was fondly regarded as by millions across the world, was assassinated by Nathuram Godse on the morning of this day in 1948, at Delhi’s Birla House.

Remembering Mahatma Gandhi

President Ram Nath Kovind and Prime Minister Narendra Modi were among those who led the nation in paying their respects to Mahatma Gandhi at Delhi’s Rajghat on Martyr’s Day.

Acclaimed sand artist Sudarshan Patnaik came up with a tribute in his inimitable style at the Puri beach in Odisha.

A two-minute silence is observed at the precise time when Mahatma Gandhi was assassinated, 11:02 am.

In an emotional address, Prime Minister Narendra Modi in his last Mann ki Baat address said,

“The path of peace and non-violence is the path of Bapu and this is applicable not only for India or the world but also for a person or a family or a society. The ideals which Bapu practiced in his life, things that he imparted, are relevant even today. What can be a bigger tribute than taking a vow that we shall tread the path of Bapu – and walk, as far as possible?”

The Early Life Of Mahatma Gandhi

The pioneer of non-violence or ahimsa, Bapu was born Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi in Porbandar, Gujarat, on 2 October 1969. After his initial education in India, he went to London to study law in the late 1880s.

After completing his law studies, he returned to India to work as a barrister and then moved to Natal, South Africa, where he soon began working towards improving the conditions of the Indian minority in that country. It was here that he began to be noticed as a powerful figure that could effectively use non-violence and to fight injustice, in this case segregation on the basis of race.

Mahatma Gandhi And His Return To India

By the time he returned to India in 1915, he was already a known name in the freedom movement circles. Not surprisingly, he soon became a key figure in the Indian National Congress (INC), which was fighting for India’s Independence from the British.

Mahatma Gandhi continued to use non-violence to persuade the British to leave India and called these Satyagraha (the path of truth). One of his most famous campaigns was the Salt March, or the Dandi Yatra, in 1930.

By the 1940s, Gandhi and other freedom fighters managed to convince the British that they would have to leave India, culminating in India’s Independence on 15 August 1947.

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